The Industries How Pottery is Made


 Manual method

The method of hand-forming pottery is one of the oldest methods of pottery making, but it is still used, especially by the Japanese, as they make pottery raku tea cups by hand. The design of handcrafted pottery is done using the fingers of the hand and especially the thumb, and flat clay plates are used that are stuck together using Liquid clay, with the aim of making square or rectangular vessels, and it is noteworthy that hollow pottery has witnessed a great development and contributed to the manufacture of many beautiful vessels since ancient times, by forming long rolls of clay arranged on top of each other, and forming them in a circular way, so that their walls are smoothed, Level it to obtain the desired final look. [1]


Pottery wheel

The pottery wheel is considered one of the methods used to make pottery in Egypt before 4000 BC, so that the clay is placed in the center of the wheel that rotates the clay during the process of forming it by hand, or by copying the main shape to be manufactured using a specific tool, then pouring it into the mold and leaving it to dry before Put it in the oven at high temperatures to harden it. [2]


fire

Pottery can be made using fire in order to dry it completely and prevent it from melting once in contact with water. Thanks to the chemical change that takes place during the formation of pottery, and it is worth noting that in the eighteenth, nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century the use of huge glass furnaces that were fired with coal became common, but coal was replaced by cleaner fuels, such as: natural gas, propane gas, and wood. , Electricity, and others. [3]


Firewood

The Japanese used to use firewood in pottery making, by placing pottery in a nagama, which is an oven that has a door inside which looks like a tunnel, or by placing it in a multi-chamber oven called Noborigama, and the use of these wood-fired ovens has spread all over the world. (3) ]


References

↑ George Savage (13-2-2019), "Pottery", www.britannica.com, Retrieved 26-3-2019.

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